There’s no doubt that working from home has its perks. In fact, we are currently experiencing something akin to a remote work revolution, with more and more companies embracing the idea.

This is despite the fact that a significant body of research has found that working remotely can have negative effects on employees’ productivity and overall wellbeing.

Millennials (as well as other generations) tend to thrive in a work environment where they are able to form personal and professional relationships. But when working remotely, they can easily feel isolated from their colleagues.

This can lead to increased feelings of loneliness and anxiety, which can in turn have a negative impact on their work.

It’s also worth noting that millennials are often the most vocal critics of remote work.

In a recent survey, nearly half of millennial employees said they would rather have a shorter workweek than be able to telecommute, which is surprising considering the fact that they are also the generation most likely to telecommute.

Why Do Employers Like And Want Younger Workers?

There are a number of reasons why employers like to hire younger workers; for one, they tend to be more tech-savvy and up-to-date on the latest trends. They’re also generally more energetic and enthusiastic about their work.

What Are The Benefits Of Employers Hiring Teenage Workers?

One of the main benefits of hiring younger workers is that they tend to be more onboard with the latest trends in their field and this makes them ideal candidates for positions that require strong technical skills, such as software development or graphic design.

Additionally, younger workers often come across as both more energetic and enthusiastic about their work, which really helps to drive innovation and creativity in the workplace.

They also tend to be more motivated by opportunities for career growth and development, which can only benefit employers in the long run.

So, What Are Some Of The Challenges That Come With Hiring Younger Workers?

Employers may face a few uphill battles when hiring younger members of staff, in particular when it comes to managing expectations on both sides.

Because they are often more motivated by career growth and development, employers need to be clear about what the position entails and what the company can realistically offer in terms of advancement opportunities.

Gripes frequently heard in the office hallways will most likely be around all the tasks that were NOT covered in a job description or the lack of promotion/moving up the payscale, etc.

Another challenge that employers may face is dealing with the stereotype that younger workers are entitled or lazy.

This is (mostly) a misconception, but employers need to be aware of this perception and be prepared to manage it if and/when it arises.

Overall, however, these challenges are relatively minor in comparison to the benefits that younger workers can bring to a company.

Arguments Against Remote Working

These are often based on the assumption that it has negative effects on employees’ productivity and overall wellbeing. While there is some evidence to support this claim, other research suggests that remote working can be beneficial for certain types of workers.

Studies have shown that remote workers are generally more productive than those who work in-office, as they tend to be more motivated and focused on their work.

In addition, remote workers are also less likely to experience burnout or job-related stress than those who continue to work in an office setting.

Despite these benefits, there are certain drawbacks to working from home.

For example, feelings of isolation/loneliness are a biggie; not having regular contact/interactions with colleagues (or even the people they meet on their way to/from the office) can do a real number on mental health.

This, in turn, can then negatively affect their morale, as well as their productivity and overall wellbeing.

Who Is Gen Z?

Gen Z is the demographic cohort that follows the Millennial generation and is composed of individuals born between 1996 and 2010.

This generation is often referred to as “digital natives” because they grew up during a time when technology was rapidly evolving.

As such, Gen Z workers are comfortable with using new technologies and tend to be more tech-savvy than their older counterparts.

Notably, they are also often more independent/entrepreneurial than previous generations and are known for being highly social media-savvy and for being the most ethnically and racially diverse generation in history.

Gen Z And Remote Work

The youngest generation of workers, known as Gen Z, is also beginning to enter the workforce and is increasingly interested in remote work – this has led some employers and business leaders to question whether or not remote work is right for their younger employees.

While there certainly are potential benefits to Gen Z workers when it comes to remote working (increased productivity; reduced stress, etc.) there are also some (possibly) significant drawbacks.

Gen Z employees may, like their colleagues, struggle with feeling disconnected and isolated from the workplace culture and the concern could be that they are more likely to struggle to focus on their work because they are not operating from the same well-tested template than their ‘older’ colleagues are.

The experience of physically showing up to an office/desk every morning, day after day, is still seen as the gold standard by most employers, and the idea that this particular element of ‘control’ over their staff is removed could probably make the majority of companies break out in a cold sweat…!

Why Remote Working Could Be Good

While there definitely are some possible pitfalls to consider when it comes to remote working for younger employees, there are also several potential benefits.

As mentioned above, studies have shown that remote workers are generally more productive than those who work in-office, as they tend to be more motivated and focused on their work.

Having more of a say in how their work time is spent has become a rather large carrot for a lot of office workers and the same could be true for Gen Z workers who are entering the workforce.

There are also several studies that have found that remote workers are less likely to experience burnout or job-related stress than those who work in an office setting.

Again, the control handed back to the employee could be the difference between them managing to fit everything in, like a workout, drop-off/pick up of kids, self-care, etc. OR feeling like everything is out of control because working from the office means missing those same things (workout, drop-off/pick up of kids, self-care, etc).

Why Employees Should Not Work From Home

If you’re an employer considering whether or not to allow your employees to work from home, it’s important to carefully consider the potential drawbacks and benefits before making your decision.

So, while there are some benefits to remote working for younger employees, such as increased productivity and reduced job-related stress, it’s important to carefully consider whether this option is right for them.

Ultimately, employers need to weigh the pros and cons of remote work when deciding whether or not to allow it for their younger employees.

Do Employers Prefer Younger Employees to Work Remotely?

While many employers today prefer their younger employees to work remotely, it is not always the right option for this demographic.

This is because Gen Z employees have unique needs and preferences that need to be considered when determining whether or not remote working will be effective for them.

That said, some employers do find that allowing their younger workers to work remotely benefits their productivity, motivation, and focus.

As such, it’s important for employers to carefully consider all of the factors involved when deciding whether or not to allow remote working for their younger employees.

So, while many employers today value the flexibility that remote work offers younger employees, this option is not always best suited for Gen Z workers.

Employers must take a comprehensive approach when determining whether or not to allow remote working for their Gen Z employees and consider all of the potential pros and cons before making a final decision.

While some employers prefer younger employees to work remotely, it is important for them to carefully weigh all of the factors involved before making this decision.

Ultimately, employers need to carefully assess whether remote working is right for their younger employees, as it could have both positive and negative effects on them.​

FAQs

Why is working from home so hard?

There are a number of reasons why working from home can be difficult. For example, some people may feel isolated or disconnected from their colleagues, which can make it difficult to focus on work. Additionally, working from home could also negatively affect an employee’s productivity and overall wellbeing.

Is remote work bad for employees?

No, remote work is not necessarily bad for employees. While some people may find it difficult to focus on work or feel isolated when working remotely, there are also many potential benefits of remote working, such as increased productivity and reduced job-related stress.
As such, it’s important for employers to carefully consider all of the factors involved when deciding whether to allow their younger employees to work remotely.​
For younger employees, remote work can have both positive and negative effects. While some employers may find that allowing their younger workers to work remotely benefits their productivity and focus, others may discover that this option is not best suited for Gen Z employees.
As such, it’s important for employers to carefully assess all of the factors involved before making a decision about whether or not to allow remote work for their younger employees.

Are remote jobs safe?

There is no definitive answer to this question as it depends on a variety of factors, such as the type of job and the company’s remote work policies. However, in general, remote jobs are generally safe, as long as the proper precautions are taken by both the employer and the employee.
When it comes to deciding whether or not to allow their younger employees to work remotely, employers must carefully assess all of the potential risks and benefits before making a decision.
Ultimately, it is up to the employer to determine whether or not remote working is right for their business and their employees.

Do younger employees prefer remote work?

There is no universal answer to this question as every employee is different. Some younger employees may prefer the flexibility and freedom that remote work offers, while others may find it difficult to focus on work or feel isolated when working remotely.
As such, it’s important for employers to carefully consider all of the factors involved before deciding whether or not to allow their younger employees to work remotely.​

Is working remotely healthy?

There is no definitive answer to this question, as it depends on a variety of factors, such as an individual’s work habits and the company’s remote work policies. However, in general, working remotely can be healthy if done correctly and if employees take steps to mitigate any potential negative effects.
As such, employers must carefully assess all of the potential risks and benefits of remote work before making a decision about whether or not to allow their employees to work remotely.

What are the challenges of remote communication?

There are a number of challenges involved in remote communication, such as the need to establish clear and effective channels for communication, as well as the potential for miscommunication or misunderstanding due to cultural differences or other factors.
Employers must carefully consider all of these potential risks and challenges before deciding whether or not to allow their younger employees to work remotely.
Ultimately, it is up to each individual employer to determine whether or not remote work is right for their business and employees.​
So, while some younger employees may prefer remote work due to the increased flexibility and freedom it offers, others may find that working remotely can negatively impact their productivity, focus, or overall wellbeing.
As such, employers must carefully assess all of the potential risks and benefits associated with remote work before deciding whether or not to allow their younger employees to work remotely.​

Wrapping Up:

Overall, while there are a number of potential benefits to allowing younger employees to work remotely, there are also a number of risks and challenges that must be considered.

Employers should carefully assess all of the potential risks and benefits involved before making a decision about whether or not to allow their younger employees to work remotely.

About the Author

Passionate about helping households transition to sustainable energy with helpful information and resources.

{"email":"Email address invalid","url":"Website address invalid","required":"Required field missing"}