A sand-set paver base is a traditional and best material to lay pavers on.

There are a few others but you’ll find a sand-set paver base is the easiest to work with.

The primary purpose of the base is to support the weight of the pavers and people walking on them. It also keeps weed growth at bay and provides good drainage for rainwater.

What is a Paver Base?

A paver base is a material you will use to create a foundation for your pavers.

The most common paver base is gravel, but other options include sand, concrete, or stone.

The important thing is to choose a material that will provide a stable foundation for your pavers and allow water to drain away from them.

  • Subbase.
  • Baselayer.
  • Bedding layer.
  • Jointing sand.

Subbase

The subbase is the layer of material between the pavers and the ground. It is typically made up of gravel, crushed stone, or other aggregate materials.

The subbase should be at least 4 inches thick and should be compacted to create a stable foundation for the pavers.

Baselayer

The base layer is the layer of material between the subbase and the pavers. It is typically made up of sand, concrete, or stone.

The base layer should be at least 1 inch thick and should be level before the pavers are installed.

Bedding layer

The bedding layer is the layer of material between the paver and the jointing sand. It is typically made up of sand, concrete, or stone.

The bedding layer should be at least 1/4 inch thick and should be level before the pavers are installed.

Related: What Is The Best Sand For Paver Joints? (WITH OPTIONS)

Jointing Sand

Jointing sand is used to fill the joints between pavers. It is important to use jointing sand that is compatible with the type of pavers you are using.

Jointing sand should be swept into the joints between the pavers and then compacted to create a stable foundation for the pavers.

Related: The Cheapest Way to Lay a Patio

The Most Paver Bases

  • Sand-set base
  • Open-graded base
  • Synthetic base

Sand-set base

The sand-set base is the most common type of base for patio pavers. It is made up of a layer of sand that is compacted to create a stable foundation for the pavers.

The sand-set base should be at least 4 inches thick and should be level before the pavers are installed.

Related: The Cheapest Way to Lay a Patio (INC. THE BEST MATERIALS)

Open-graded base

The open-graded base is made up of a layer of gravel that is compacted to create a stable foundation for the pavers.

The open-graded base should be at least 4 inches thick and should be level before the pavers are installed.

Synthetic base

The synthetic base is made up of a layer of plastic that is compacted to create a stable foundation for the pavers.

The synthetic base should be at least 4 inches thick and should be level before the pavers are installed.

Related: The Cheapest Way To Lay A Patio

FAQs

What size of crushed stone for pavers should I use?

Use a 3 to 4-inch depth of crushed stone beneath a 3 to 4-inch depth of surfacing material for walkways and patios. In total, you’ll need to dig 6 to 8 inches deep.

Related: Do Slate Patio Slabs Scratch? (A Quick No-Nonsense Guide)

What is the best depth for a paver base?

Paver patios are typically laid with a thickness of 3 to 3 1/2 inches. As a result, in order to accommodate any type of paver, you’ll need a paver patio base depth of around 9 inches (22.86 cm). Sand or gravel will be used to fill 5 inches (12.7 cm) of the base.

Best paver base for clay soil?

You’ll need approximately 2 to 3 inches of aggregate rock, a few inches of sand, and then your pavers (which should be 1 inch above grade to help drainage and sweeping). Because most pavers are roughly 2 to 3 inches thick, this indicates that in poorly drained clay soils, you’ll have to dig down 6 to 8 inches for a paver patio base.

Are paver base panels any good?

Yes, since they reduce the cost of diffing and hauling away excavated soil, as well as the backfilling of sand and gravel. Paver base panels also help to prevent weeds and grass from growing through your patio pavers. It also allows installations in fenced-in yards without having to remove the fence.

Related: Is It Cheaper To Make Your Own Concrete Pavers?

Related: How Do I Dispose Of Patio Pavers? (QUICK AND EASY)

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