If you’re looking to build your first deck or replace an existing one, you’ll need to know about the different types of deck footings.

Here are 10 Popular Types of Deck Footings:

1. Poured Concrete Footings

Likely the most popular and easiest type of footing, pouring concrete is a fast way to create a stable foundation for your deck.

You can either have the concrete poured by a professional or do it yourself. The downside to poured concrete footings is that they require some advance planning.

You’ll need to dig out the area where you want your footing and then fill it with concrete. Once the concrete has cured, you can then move on to building your deck.

Poured concrete footings are a good choice for decks that will be attached to a house or other structure.

Pros

  • Waterproof.
  • Adaptability.
  • Fast Application.
  • Fire Resistance.
  • Compressive Strength.
  • Flexural Strength.

Cons

  • Slabs sometimes crack.
  • Decks on slabs are not always seen as that nice.

Related: Will Pressure-Treated Wood Rot In Concrete? (MAYBE?)

2. Floating Deck Block Footings

If you’re looking for an easy way to build a ground-level deck, floating deck block footings are the way to go.

These blocks are specially designed for building decks, and they’re easy to use. All you have to do is level the area where you want your deck and then set the blocks in place.

Once the blocks are in place, you can then build your deck on top of them.

One thing to keep in mind with floating deck block footings is that they’re not as stable as other types of footings.

If you live in an area with high winds or severe weather conditions, you may want to consider another type of footing.

Pros

  • Good for low decks.
  • Decks around tress.
  • Areas with low frost levels

Cons

  • Only for specific use cases.
  • Can put a strain on a certain side of the deck.
  • Can sometimes pull away from the house.

Related: Deck Replacement: When It’s Needed & What You Need To Do

3. Cinder Block Footings

If you’re looking for a cheap and easy way to build your deck, cinder block footings are a good option.

Cinder blocks are readily available at most home improvement stores, and they’re easy to work with. all you have to do is dig out the area where you want your deck and then set the blocks in place.

Once the blocks are in place, you can then build your deck on top of them.

Pros

  • Can be reinforced to make the structure stronger.
  • Provides a reasonable degree of fire resistance without the use of chemicals.

Cons

  • Water seepage might occur over time.
  • Not as visually attractive.

4. Concrete Pier Blocks

If you’re looking for a more permanent and stable way to build your deck, concrete pier blocks are a good option.

Concrete pier blocks are large blocks of concrete that are designed specifically for building decks.

To use them, you’ll need to dig out the area where you want your deck and then set the blocks in place. Once the blocks are in place, you can then build your deck on top of them.

One thing to keep in mind with concrete pier blocks is that they’re very heavy. You’ll need to have a way to lift and move them into place.

Additionally, you’ll need to make sure that the ground where you’re setting them is level.

Pros

  • Can be systematic in the build process.
  • Easy to work with.
  • Stronger than most support systems.

Cons

  • Water seepage might occur over time.
  • Not as visually attractive.

5. Raised Deck Footings

If you’re looking to build a raised deck, you’ll need to use raised deck footings.

Raised deck footings are larger and taller than other types of footings, and they’re designed specifically for raised decks.

To use them, you’ll need to dig out the area where you want your deck and then set the blocks in place.

Once the blocks are in place, you can then build your deck on top of them.

Pros

  • Perfect for decking that will be raised off the ground.
  • Very strong and stable.

Cons

  • Can be difficult to install.
  • Not the cheapest option.
  • Specific use cases.

6. Wooden Deck Footings

If you’re looking for a more traditional way to build your deck, wooden deck footings are a good option.

Wooden deck footings are made from pressure-treated lumber, and they’re easy to work with.

To use them, you’ll need to dig out the area where you want your deck and then set the lumber in place. Once the lumber is in place, you can then build your deck on top of it.

Pros

  • Cheap to buy and install.
  • Easy to work with.
  • Can be cut to any size or shape.
  • Can be purchased almost anywhere.

Cons

  • Not as strong as some other options.
  • Can rot over time if not properly maintained.
  • Higher maintenance.

Related: When Should I Use Pressure-Treated Lumber?

7. Frost Heave Deck Footings

If you live in an area with a high water table or severe weather conditions, you’ll need to use frost heave deck footings.

Frost heave deck footings are designed to prevent your deck from being lifted out of the ground by a frost heave.

To use them, you’ll need to dig out the area where you want your deck and then set the footings in place.

Once the footings are in place, you can then build your deck on top of them.

Pros

  • Perfect for cold weather conditions.
  • Prevents the deck from being lifted out of the ground.

Cons

  • Can be difficult to install.
  • Not the cheapest option.
  • Specific use cases.

8. Auger Deck Footings

If you’re looking for a quick and easy way to install your deck footings, auger deck footings are a good option.

Auger deck footings are designed to be installed quickly and easily, and they’re perfect for small decks.

To use them, you’ll need to dig out the area where you want your deck and then set the augers in place. Once the augers are in place, you can then build your deck on top of them.

Pros

  • Can be installed quickly and easily.
  • Perfect for small decks.

Cons

  • Not as strong as some other options.
  • Can be difficult to install on hard ground.

9. Pile Deck Footings

If you’re looking for a more permanent and stable way to build your deck, pile deck footings are a good option.

Pile deck footings are driven into the ground, and they’re very sturdy. To use them, you’ll need to dig out the area where you want your deck and then set the piles in place.

Once the piles are in place, you can then build your deck on top of them.

Pros

  • Quick to install.
  • Work in a variety of soil conditions.
  • Have relatively low embodied energy.

Cons

10. Helical Pier Deck Footings

If you’re looking for a more permanent and stable way to build your deck, helical pier deck footings are a good option.

Helical pier deck footings are driven into the ground, and they’re very sturdy.

To use them, you’ll need to dig out the area where you want your deck and then set the piers in place. Once the piers are in place, you can then build your deck on top of them.

Pros

  • Flexible and easy to work with
  • Can be installed where concrete can’t.

Cons

  • More expensive than some other options.
  • May require a permit.

11. Buried Post Footings

If you’re looking to build a deck that’s attached to your house, you’ll need to use buried post footings.

Buried post footings are designed to be installed next to your house, and they’re perfect for attaching your deck to your home.

To use them, you’ll need to dig out the area where you want your deck and then set the posts in place. Once the posts are in place, you can then build your deck on top of them.

Pros

  • Less labor intensive than some other options.
  • Can be installed quickly and easily.

Cons

  • Not as strong as some other options.
  • Can rot over time if not properly maintained.

12. Free-Standing Deck Footings

If you’re looking to build a free-standing deck, you’ll need to use free-standing deck footings.

Free-standing deck footings are designed to be installed away from your house, and they’re perfect for decks that aren’t attached to your home.

To use them, you’ll need to dig out the area where you want your deck and then set the footings in place. Once the footings are in place, you can then build your deck on top of them.

Pros

  • Water remains away from the house.
  • Easier to install than some other options.

Cons

  • May not be as strong as some other options.
  • Can be more expensive than some other options.

13. Post and pier footings

Post and pier footing decks are perfect for areas with difficult soil conditions.

If you live in an area with difficult soil conditions, you’ll need to use post and pier footing decks.

Post and pier footing decks are designed to be installed in areas with difficult soil conditions, and they’re perfect for decks that are built on slopes or hillsides.

To use them, you’ll need to dig out the area where you want your deck and then set the posts and piers in place. Once the posts and piers are in place, you can then build your deck on top of them.

Pros

  • Requires very little materials and labor.
  • Can be installed quickly and easily.

Cons

  • Not as strong as some other options.
  • Can be more expensive than some other options.

14. Precast concrete footings

Precast concrete footing decks are perfect for areas with difficult soil conditions.

If you live in an area with difficult soil conditions, you’ll need to use precast concrete footing decks.

Precast concrete footing decks are designed to be installed in areas with difficult soil conditions, and they’re perfect for decks that are built on slopes or hillsides.

To use them, you’ll need to dig out the area where you want your deck and then set the footings in place. Once the footings are in place, you can then build your deck on top of them.

Pros

  • Robust and durable.
  • Can be installed quickly and easily.

Cons

  • More expensive than some other options.
  • May require a permit.

15. Grade beam footing decks

If you’re looking for a permanent and stable way to build your deck, grade beam footing decks are a good option.

Grade beam footing decks are very sturdy, and they’re perfect for large decks.

To use them, you’ll need to dig out the area where you want your deck and then set the footings in place.

Once the footings are in place, you can then build your deck on top of them.

Pros

  • Very sturdy and durable.
  • Can support a large deck.

Cons

  • More expensive than some other options.
  • May require a permit.

FAQs

Is a deck foundation the same as a deck footing?

No, a deck foundation is not the same as a deck footing. The part of your deck that sits on the ground and supports its weight of it is known as a deck foundation. A deck footing is an alternative type of foundation designed to support your deck’s posts.

Do I need a permit to build a deck footing?

It is determined by your local building code. To construct a deck footing, you’ll need a permit, so it’s best to verify with your local building department first.

How much does it cost to build a deck footing?

The cost of constructing a deck foundation is determined by the type of footing you select and the size of your deck. A deck footer generally costs between $100 and $1,000.

What is the difference between a deck footing and a deck pier?

A deck pier is a kind of foundation that supports the weight of your deck. A deck footing, on the other hand, is a type of foundation that supports the weight of your deck.

Do I need to use concrete for my deck footing?

It depends on the type of footing you use. Some types of footings, such as precast concrete footings, require concrete. Other types, such as post and pier footings, don’t require concrete.

About the Author

Passionate about helping households transition to sustainable energy with helpful information and resources.

{"email":"Email address invalid","url":"Website address invalid","required":"Required field missing"}